Fortunella , 2019, reclaimed lumber, neon plexiglass, kumquats, bamboo walking sticks, jasmine tea, jujube, window privacy film, tea tin lid, house paint, brass hardware, 34 x 100 x 26 inches

Fortunella, 2019, reclaimed lumber, neon plexiglass, kumquats, bamboo walking sticks, jasmine tea, jujube, window privacy film, tea tin lid, house paint, brass hardware, 34 x 100 x 26 inches

 
 

Fortunella, 2019. Detail view of kumquats (retired genus Fortunella) and jasmine tea.

 

Fortunella, 2019. Detail view: references scientific illustrations of Serpula lacrymans, a dry rot fungus once local to the Himalayas. The fungus travelled with British expansion and decayed wooden ships such as those used by Robert Fortune.

 
 
Ex Situ,  2019, reclaimed lumber, unfired porcelain, poppy seeds, tree resin, brass hardware, house paint, mold, 8 x 60 x 10 inches

Ex Situ, 2019, reclaimed lumber, unfired porcelain, poppy seeds, tree resin, brass hardware, house paint, mold, 8 x 60 x 10 inches

Ex Situ , 2019, detail view of mold on poppy seeds

Ex Situ, 2019, detail view of mold on poppy seeds

 
 

Wardian Cases

Re-interpretations of the hermetic wooden and glass cases designed by London physician Nathaniel Bagshaw Ward to transport specimens of colonial botany overseas. In the mid-1800s, the British East India Company sent botanist Robert Fortune to smuggle 20,000 tea plants from China into plantations in India using Wardian cases. The projects use materials that reference the troubled history of these expeditions.

Ex Situ examines the entanglement of tea trade, porcelain, and the start of the Opium Wars. Mold grows between the poppy seeds and unfired porcelain “terrace.”

Wardian cases full of cycads from Rockhampton, Queensland, arrive at the Missouri Botanic Gardens after a long journey via London and New York, c.1920. Missouri Botanic Gardens.

Wardian cases full of cycads from Rockhampton, Queensland, arrive at the Missouri Botanic Gardens after a long journey via London and New York, c.1920. Missouri Botanic Gardens.